JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use the Site in standard view. However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser. To use standard view, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options.

| Last Updated:04/12/2018

Latest News

Archive

New norms make cement plants to seek wildlife nod

With the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) stipulating all projects falling within the purview of 10 km radius of a sanctuary or a national park to seek clearance from the National Wildlife Board (NWB), several projects, including existing cement plants, have been forced to seek a clearance, despite the fact that the plant is running for years now.

The new directions, issued by the MoEF in 2012, have affected two major cement plants —JayPrakash Associates and Ambuja Cements Limited — as they are located in close proximity to the Majathal Wildlife Sanctuary.

The State Wildlife Board (SWB), in a recent meeting, considered several such projects, including those of the existing cement plants, and informed that these cases would now be forwarded to the NWB after due consideration.

Since sanctuaries and national parks are considered protected areas where wild animals and rare plants thrive, the new directions will ensure that there is no imminent threat to their survival due to various activities undertaken by the plant.

Dr Lalit Mohan, Chief Wildlife Warden-cum-Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (Wildlife), said three projects, including two cement units and one hydro electric project, had applied before the SWB for seeking clearance.

He said all the three projects had been cleared after scrutinising their conservation plans and EIA reports and their cases have been recommended to the NWB.

He said since these guidelines were issued in 2012, all such projects would have to seek a clearance.

The need to seek this additional clearance arose after the standing committee of the MoEF observed that these protected areas form the habitat of many endangered species and biodiversity activities of developmental and industrial projects could threaten their existence.

It was also observed that there was scant regard to the laws of the land and this mandated the need for strict vigilance.

The casual manner in which such projects were dealt with had become an issue of concern for the MoEF and it was decided that the complete project details along with maps, impact on the habitat etc must be presented before the standing committee of the NWB.

New directions

  • Since sanctuaries and national parks are considered protected areas where wild animals and rare plants thrive, the State Wildlife Board feels that there will be no imminent threat to their survival due to various activities undertaken by the plant.
  • The need to seek the additional clearance arose after the standing committee of the Ministry of Environment and Forests observed that these protected areas form a habitat of many endangered species and biodiversity activities of developmental and industrial projects could threaten their existence.

The Tribune (26-12-2013)