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| Last Updated: 10/08/2020

Upcoming Event

Past Event

International Tiger Day: 29th July, 2020

          There are only around 3,900 tigers in the wild. With the support of Tiger Protectors around the world, they are beginning to make a comeback.

The tiger is the largest of the world’s big cats and this magnificent creature, with its distinctive orange and black stripes and beautifully marked face, has a day that is dedicated to it.

 About International Tiger Day

 International Tiger Day has been created so that people around the world can raise awareness for tiger conservation. The aim of the day is to help promote a worldwide system whereby we are dedicated to protecting tigers and their natural habitats.

 History of International Tiger Day

 Wild tiger populations have declined by around 95% since the beginning of the 20th century. There’s now estimated to be around 3,900 wild tigers. Each tiger has a unique set of stripes – like a fingerprint – and this helps us identify individuals in the wild. The tiger is officially classed as endangered by the IUCN. This was first celebrated in 2010 and was founded at an international summit.  Tigers are on the brink of extinction and International World Tiger Day aims to bring attention to this fact and try to halt their decline. Many international organizations are involved in the day, including the WWF, the IFAW and the Smithsonian Institute.

Issues and threats tigers are facing world- wide

 
There are a number of treats that are driving tigers close to extinction, and we can do our bit to make sure that we do not lose these incredible creatures. Some of the threats that tigers face include poaching, conflict with humans, and habitat loss. 

Poaching and the illegal trade industry is a very worrying one. This is the biggest threat that wild tigers face. Demand for tiger bone, skin, and other body parts is leading to poaching and trafficking. This is having a monumental impact on the sub-populations of tigers, resulting in localized extinctions. Moreover, bones are used for medicines and tonics. While this represents the biggest threats to tigers, there are a number of other threats as well. This includes habitat loss. Throughout the world, tiger habitats have reduced because of access routes, human settlements, timber logging, plantations, and agriculture.

In fact, only around seven percent of the historical range of a tiger is still intact today. This can increase the number of conflicts between tigers, as they roman about and try to locate new habitats. Not only this, but genetic diversity can reduce because it can cause there to be inbreeding in small populations.