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  • Bibliography
| Last Updated: :26/10/2018

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Title : : Biodiversity: new trends in Environmental Management
Subject : Corporate Environmental Strategy
Volume No. : 8
Issue No. : 1
Author : Robert Barrington
Printed Year : 2001
No of Pages  : 8
Description : 

 Abstract: For a variety of reasons, biodiversity is currently an important issue, and increasingly seen as a problem over which the corporate sector needs to take ownership. There are dramatic statistics about the decline of biodiversity, and the corporate sector is both partially responsible and subject to its impacts. This means that for most companies, the environmental goal posts are starting to move: having an Environmental Management System which controls waste and energy is now the lowest standard; the bench-mark of best practice is a sustainability strategy whose environmental aspect integrates biodiversity into the EMS. This can be achieved through company Biodiversity Action Plans, and an increasing body of best practice exists highlighting this approach


Title : : Environmental information disclosure and stakeholder involvement: Searching for common ground
Subject : Corporate Environmental Strategy
Volume No. : 6
Issue No. : 4
Author : Mark D Abkowitz, Mark A Cohen, Susan S Buck, David W Case, Patricia A Drake
Printed Year : 1999
No of Pages  : 9
Description : 

 Abstract: In a recent national summit hosted by The Vanderbuilt Center for Environmental Management Studies, high level corporate, environmental, and government officials came together to discuss the growing trend towards the disclosure of environmental information as a tool to increase public accountability. Both regulators and environmentalists showed interest in continuing to utilize and, in many cases expeand, existing environmental information disclosure programs. The summit was viewed as a catalyst in the ongoing national discussion of the efficacy of this evolving area of government policy. This article highlights some of the key results of this event and offers suggested next steps to address credibility and effectiveness in environmental information disclosure.


Title : “Economic” and “Political” cooperation in various climate policy scenarios
Subject : Climate Policy
Volume No. : 3
Issue No. : 2
Author : Bertrand Hamaide
Printed Year : 2003
No of Pages  : 181
Description : 

Abstract: Cooperation in the economic sense considers efficiency issues. Cooperation in the political sense, like the Kyoto Protocol, considers other issues like equity and historical responsibility. The environmental and economic impacts of the Kyoto Protocol and other scenarios are thus examined. The US pullout may then be viewed, among others, as the result of not untying “economic” and “political” cooperation; and since the Protocol will be much less effective without the US, it is shown that an external economic stimulus should and may theoretically be found for retaining their participation


Title : A computerized open-top field chamber system for exposing plants to air pollutants
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 7
Issue No. : 4
Author : S.D. Nystrom1, R.C. Hendrickson2, G.C. Pratt3, S.V. Krupa3
Printed Year : 1982
No of Pages  : 8
Description : 

 Abstract: A computerized open-top field chamber fumigation system is described for exposing plants to ozone and sulfur dioxide. The exposure system is capable of operating unattended for several days, maintaining and monitoring pollutant concentrations in the chambers as desired. Pollutants are dispensed to the chambers through mass flow controllers, operated by a microcomputer. Inputs to the microcomputer consist of monitored pollutant concentrations, weather and hardware function signals, feedback from mass flow controllers, and operator input via a terminal. Pollutant monitors are time-shared through solenoid valves controlled by the computer, and information is recorded by data loggers


Title : A conceptual framework and its application for addressing leakage: the case of avoided deforestation
Subject : Climate Policy
Volume No. : 3
Issue No. : 2
Author : Louise Auckland, Pedro Moura Costa, Sandra Brown
Printed Year : 2003
No of Pages  : 181
Description : 

Abstract: One of the most challenging technical issues associated with project-based mechanisms is that of leakage. A conceptual framework is proposed for the identification and analysis of leakage potentially generated by a project. The categorization of leakage based on the actors responsible for their manifestation is proposed, which divides sources of leakage into primary and secondary types. It is the actors or agents responsible for the baseline activities that cause primary leakage. Secondary leakage occurs when the project’s outputs create incentives for third parties to increase emissions elsewhere. This distinction, based on the source of leakage, provides a basis for the analysis outlined in the paper. The extent and type of leakage will vary depending on the project typology and design. Using a decision tree approach, the process of identifying potential sources of leakage is demonstrated for the case study of avoided deforestation projects. If the main elements determining a baseline are properly identified and understood, in particular the ‘baseline agents’, a combination of the decision tree approach and apportioning responsibility, can assist in the quantification and monitoring of primary leakage. An analysis at the project design stage can also assist in minimizing the risk of future leakage. Econometric methods may prove more useful in analyzing secondary leakage


Title : A friendly environmental material: Iron oxide dispersed over activated carbon from coffee husk for organic pollutants removal
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 127
Issue No. : na
Author : Maraísa Gonçalves, Mário César Guerreiro, Luiz Carlos Alves de Oliveira, Cinthia Soares de Castro
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 5
Description : 

Abstract: A friendly environmental material for organic contaminants removal was prepared in this work: small particles of iron oxide dispersed over activated carbon from coffee waste for Fenton-like application. The materials were characterized by means of XRD, N2 physisorption, Mössbauer spectroscopy and H2 pulse titration. The composites showed very good catalytic performances for methylene blue organic dye oxidation. The small goethite particles are the predominant iron oxide phase in the composites. The apparent surface area is quite high and is not very affected after iron impregnation. ESI-MS studies revealed that the dye removal occurs through a Fenton-type system by the composite whereas for the activated carbon the dye removal occurs mainly via adsorption. The iron leaching from the catalysts was negligible, less than 0.5 ppm, which evidences the occurrence of a heterogenous oxidation process. The catalyst was very active for methylene blue oxidation and could be repeatedly used for at least 5 cycles. The catalyst was also active in the oxidation of other organic compounds, such as caffeine and atrazine.


Title : A geospatial dataset for U.S. hurricane storm surge and sea-level rise vulnerability: Development and case study applications
Subject : Climate Risk Management
Volume No. : 2
Issue No. : 
Author : Megan C. Maloney, Benjamin L. Preston
Printed Year : 2014
No of Pages  : 15
Description : 

 

Abstract

The consequences of future sea-level rise for coastal communities are a priority concern arising from anthropogenic climate change. Here, previously published methods are scaled up in order to undertake a first pass assessment of exposure to hurricane storm surge and sea-level rise for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts. Sea-level rise scenarios ranging from +0.50 to +0.82 m by 2100 increased estimates of the area exposed to inundation by 4–13% and 7–20%, respectively, among different Saffir-Simpson hurricane intensity categories. Potential applications of these hazard layers for vulnerability assessment are demonstrated with two contrasting case studies: potential exposure of current energy infrastructure in the U.S. Southeast and exposure of current and future housing along both the Gulf and Atlantic Coasts. Estimates of the number of Southeast electricity generation facilities potentially exposed to hurricane storm surge ranged from 69 to 291 for category 1 and category 5 storms, respectively. Sea-level rise increased the number of exposed facilities by 6–60%, depending on the sea-level rise scenario and the intensity of the hurricane under consideration. Meanwhile, estimates of the number of housing units currently exposed to hurricane storm surge ranged from 4.1 to 9.4 million for category 1 and category 4 storms, respectively, while exposure for category 5 storms was estimated at 7.1 million due to the absence of landfalling category 5 hurricanes in the New England region. Housing exposure was projected to increase 83–230% by 2100 among different sea-level rise and housing scenarios, with the majority of this increase attributed to future housing development. These case studies highlight the utility of geospatial hazard information for national-scale coastal exposure or vulnerability assessment as well as the importance of future socioeconomic development in the assessment of coastal vulnerability.


Title : A model for the transport of pesticides in soil with diffusion-controlled rates of adsorption and desorption
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 3
Issue No. : 4
Author : M. Leistra
Printed Year : 1977
No of Pages  : 10
Description : 

 Abstract: The downward movement of a pesticide in soil, caused by different rainfall patterns, was simulated in a computation model. The movement occurred in the mobile region of a hypothetical soil system by convection together with hydrodynamic dispersion, and by diffusion. Lateral transport took place by diffusion into and out of a soil region with a stagnant liquid phase. With 40 mm of rainfall in 2 days, lateral diffusion distances of a few mm or more caused substantial deviation from the concentration—depth relationship for equilibrium adsorption. With 40 mm of rainfall scattered over 20 days, lateral diffusion distances up to a few mm had little effect, but those of about 10 mm or more had a very strong influence. The initial condition near the soil surface was extremely important. When the pesticide was initially present in the mobile region, overall mobility was comparatively great. Mobility was found to be much lower than with instantaneous adsorption and desorption, when the initial condition was equilibrium between the mobile and stagnant regions near the soil surface.


Title : A modelling approach for the assessment of the effects of Common Agricultural Policy measures on farmland biodiversity in the EU27
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 126
Issue No. : na
Author : Koen P. Overmars, John Helming, Henk van Zeijts, Torbjörn Jansson, Ida Terluin
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 9
Description : 

Abstract: In this paper we describe a methodology to model the impacts of policy measures within the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) on farm production, income and prices, and on farmland biodiversity. Two stylised scenarios are used to illustrate how the method works. The effects of CAP measures, such as subsidies and regulations, are calculated and translated into changes in land use and land-use intensity. These factors are then used to model biodiversity with a species-based indicator on a 1 km scale in the EU27. The Common Agricultural Policy Regionalised Impact Modelling System (CAPRI) is used to conduct the economic analysis and Dyna-CLUE (Conversion of Land Use and its Effects) is used to model land use changes. An indicator that expresses the relative species richness was used as the indicator for biodiversity in agricultural areas. The methodology is illustrated with a baseline scenario and two scenarios that include a specific policy. The strength of the methodology is that impacts of economic policy instruments can be linked to changes in agricultural production, prices and incomes, on the one hand, and to biodiversity effects, on the other – with land use and land-use intensity as the connecting drivers. The method provides an overall assessment, but for detailed impact assessment at landscape, farm or field level, additional analysis would be required


Title : A question of fit: Reflections on boundaries, organizations and social–ecological systems
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 130
Issue No. : na
Author : Faith Sternlieb, R. Patrick Bixler, Heidi Huber-Stearns, Ch'aska Huayhuaca
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 8
Description : 

Abstract: Although there is acknowledgment that the complexity of social-ecological systems governance demands representation from diverse perspectives, there is little agreement in the literature on how to cross both fiat (human-demarcated) and bona fide (physical) boundaries to address such complexities. As a cohort of interdisciplinary scholars, we navigate the boundary between science and practice to address the question of fit regarding the role of organizations in transcending boundaries. We found there is a need to rectify discrepancies between theories about boundaries and theories about organizations. To this end, we propose a conceptual framework to analyze transboundary organizations, an umbrella term to group the literature on boundary organizations, intermediaries and bridging organizations; we introduce this term to illustrate they are not mutually exclusive and to facilitate interdisciplinary research. We first examine social-ecological systems (SES), a framework intended to improve understandings of boundaries and governance. We then continue to unpack the complexity of boundaries and organizations, specifically through important transboundary concepts such as scale and organizational learning. This helps frame our examination of the literature on: 1) boundary organizations; 2) bridging organizations (third-party entities); and 3) intermediaries (distinguished by their position between other actors). Our review identifies a number of discrepancies that pertain to the types of boundaries discussed and the roles assigned to organizations governing SES. Important characteristics have emerged from our review of transboundary organizations including legitimacy, saliency, urgency, and credibility. In developing a conceptual framework, we argue that transboundary organizations: 1) expand upon the boundary spectrum, 2) incorporate transboundary concepts, and 3) hybridize characteristics of boundary, bridging, and intermediary organizations. We conclude with a number of considerations for transboundary organizations and recommendations for further research.


Title : A rational approach for optimizing application rates of fertilizer nitrogen to reduce potential nitrate pollution of natural waters
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 4
Issue No. : 1
Author : Bijay Singh, C.R. Biswas, G.S. Sekhon
Printed Year : 1978
No of Pages  : 7
Description : 

 Abstract: Yield, N uptake and residual NO3−-N data for wheat and maize, raised in a long-term experiment, have been discussed to determine optimum rates of fertilizer N application at which yields are least affected, while unused nitrogen, which is a potential pollutant, is reduced to a permissible level. Computation of fertilizer N rates corresponding to the points of greatest economic return and permissible N loss has been described. Optimum fertilizer N rate is the smaller of the two fertilizer N rates. By assuming a loss of 60 kg N/ha or less, as environmentally permissible, it was observed that a small yield increment of maize would have to be sacrificed for the protection of the environment; whereas, for wheat, nitrogen can be applied safely up to the point of greatest economic return. Coincidence of the rainy season with the growth period of maize in the study area seems to have reduced the fertilizer N rate, corresponding to the point of permissible N loss, lower than that for greatest economic return.


Title : A recovery and reuse system for fatty oils from by-products and waste materials of vegetable fatty oil production
Subject : Conservation & Recycling
Volume No. : 10
Issue No. : 4
Author : Moritsugu Daido
Printed Year : 1987
No of Pages  : 5
Description : 

Abstract: Toei Chemical Co., Ltd. is one of the enterprises that systematically utilises by-products and industrial wastes. Only a few such enterprises are found in Japan. In our company, the crude fatty acids are recovered from the alkali foots (residual phospholipids) which are generated during the refining process for vegetable fats and oils. Moreover, the crude fatty acids are distilled for production of the soybean fatty acids, rapeseed fatty acids, and so forth. In the case of fractional distillation, simple fatty acids are produced. Also, our company has established a system for recovering vegetable fats and oils from the spent clay generated during the above-mentioned refining process. The system is so reliable that the quality of the vegetable fats and oils complies with JAS standards


Title : Abernathy’s Surgical Secrets, 7th Edition
Subject : Abernathy’s Surgical Secrets, 7th Edition
Volume No. : 7
Issue No. : 
Author : Alden H. Harken; Ernest E. Moore
Printed Year : 2018
No of Pages  : 560
Description : 

Description

For more than 30 years, the highly regarded Secrets Series® has provided students and practitioners in all areas of health care with concise, focused, and engaging resources for quick reference and exam review. Abernathy’s Surgical Secrets, 7th Edition, features the Secrets’ popular question-and-answer format that also includes lists, tables, and an easy-to-read style – making reference and review quick, easy, and enjoyable.

 

 

Key Features

  • The proven Secrets® format gives you the most return for your time – concise, easy to read, engaging, and highly effective.

  • Covers the full range of essential topics in general surgery for in-training or practicing professionals.

  • Written by global experts and thought leaders in surgery.

  • Top 100 Secrets and Key Points boxes provide a fast overview of the secrets you must know for success in practice and on exams.

  • Portable size makes it easy to carry with you for quick reference or review anywhere, anytime.

  • Fully updated throughout, with clear illustrations, figures, and flow diagrams that expedite study and review.

 

 


Title : Adaptation of herders to droughts and privatization of rangeland-use rights in the arid Alxa Left Banner of Inner Mongolia
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 126
Issue No. : na
Author : Chengcheng Zhang, Wenjun Li, Mingming Fan
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 8
Description : 

Abstract: Residents of arid areas have developed their own adaptive strategies and adaptive capability to cope with an unstable environment that experiences frequent droughts. These strategies and this capability are based on traditional practices that developed from a profound understanding of their environment, but both the strategies and the capability have been affected by institutional change. Specifically, rangeland-use rights in the Alxa Left Banner were privatized in 1996, and the implementation of this policy decreased the ability of local herders to use traditional solutions. In this paper, we describe the change in their adaptive capability after implementation of this policy. Traditionally, local knowledge of the heterogeneity of resources and of key resources based on a deep understanding of the local environment, combined with tight social relationships, let herders use three traditional grazing strategies (seasonal migration, long-distance migration, and raising a diversity of livestock species) to mitigate the impacts of drought. But privatization has nearly eliminated their ability to rely on these traditional strategies and has weakened the forms of social and other capital that supported these strategies and provided a high adaptive capability. We argue that this institutional change has adversely affected traditional practices and undermined the adaptive capability of herders. Consequently, managers of the Alxa Left Banner must find ways to restore the various forms of capital to restore the herders' adaptive capability, particularly given the growing need to account for future climate change.


Title : Adaptation of herders to droughts and privatization of rangeland-use rights in the arid Alxa Left Banner of Inner Mongolia
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 126
Issue No. : na
Author : Chengcheng Zhang, Wenjun Li, Mingming Fan
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 8
Description : 

Abstract: Residents of arid areas have developed their own adaptive strategies and adaptive capability to cope with an unstable environment that experiences frequent droughts. These strategies and this capability are based on traditional practices that developed from a profound understanding of their environment, but both the strategies and the capability have been affected by institutional change. Specifically, rangeland-use rights in the Alxa Left Banner were privatized in 1996, and the implementation of this policy decreased the ability of local herders to use traditional solutions. In this paper, we describe the change in their adaptive capability after implementation of this policy. Traditionally, local knowledge of the heterogeneity of resources and of key resources based on a deep understanding of the local environment, combined with tight social relationships, let herders use three traditional grazing strategies (seasonal migration, long-distance migration, and raising a diversity of livestock species) to mitigate the impacts of drought. But privatization has nearly eliminated their ability to rely on these traditional strategies and has weakened the forms of social and other capital that supported these strategies and provided a high adaptive capability. We argue that this institutional change has adversely affected traditional practices and undermined the adaptive capability of herders. Consequently, managers of the Alxa Left Banner must find ways to restore the various forms of capital to restore the herders' adaptive capability, particularly given the growing need to account for future climate change.


Title : Addressing the challenges of transboundary pollution: Leadership in the state of Maine
Subject : Corporate Environmental Strategy
Volume No. : 6
Issue No. : 3
Author : Ned Sullivan
Printed Year : 1999
No of Pages  : 10
Description : 

 Abstract: Mercury contamination is a classic transboundary pollution problem. In the State of Maine, government leaders played a pivotal role in developing a plan to combat problems with emission sources in the United States and Canada. These transboundary pollution issues are important for policy makers, environmental groups and industry leaders alike. It is crucial that each of these stakeholders provide input regarding any program or policy that attempts to control this type of pollution. This article depicts how, in the state of Maine, the Department of Environmental Protection and governor Angus King orchestrated a regional policy on transboundary pollution issues that included Canadian provinces as well as the U.S.


Title : Advanced Remote Sensing
Subject : Remote Sensing
Volume No. : 1
Issue No. : 1
Author : Shunlin Liang, Xiaowen Li and Jindi Wang
Printed Year : 2012
No of Pages  : 800
Description : 

 

Advanced Remote Sensing is an application-based reference that provides a single source of mathematical concepts necessary for remote sensing data gathering and assimilation. It presents state-of-the-art techniques for estimating land surface variables from a variety of data types, including optical sensors such as RADAR and LIDAR. Scientists in a number of different fields including geography, geology, atmospheric science, environmental science, planetary science and ecology will have access to critically-important data extraction techniques and their virtually unlimited applications. While rigorous enough for the most experienced of scientists, the techniques are well designed and integrated, making the book’s content intuitive, clearly presented, and practical in its implementation.

 

Key Features

  • Comprehensive overview of various practical methods and algorithms
  • Detailed description of the principles and procedures of the state-of-the-art algorithms
  • Real-world case studies open several chapters
  • More than 500 full-color figures and tables
  • Edited by top remote sensing experts with contributions from authors across the geosciences

Title : Agricultural structure, agricultural policy, and environmental quality: Some observations on the context of agricultural research in North America
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 7
Issue No. : 2
Author : Frederick H. Buttel, Michael E. Gertler
Printed Year : 1982
No of Pages  : 18
Description : 

 Abstract: This paper discusses how the context of agricultural research in North America is shaped by the structure of agricultural production, by agricultural policy, and by the nature of agricultural research institutions. Our principal concerns are: (1) the historical influences of agricultural research on the structure of agricultural production and on resource management in North American agriculture, and (2) the constraints on agricultural research institutions in developing technologies which will facilitate the husbanding of agroecosystems. We argue that the autonomous role of agricultural research in shaping the structure of agriculture and in causing degradation of agricultural resources is often overestimated; for example, the principal dynamics of change in North American agriculture were apparent well before the surge of productivity-oriented agricultural research after World War II. We also suggest that the nature of North American agricultural structure and historical and contemporary agricultural policies have decidedly influenced the context of agricultural research and have led to a number of major barriers to more beneficent management of agricultural resources. The distinctive characteristics of North American agricultural research institutions are emphasized, particularly those characteristics such as the decentralized nature of agricultural research in conjunction with the often invisible power of professional scientific organizations that limit the ability of research institutions to develop innovative approaches to agricultural resource management. Nonetheless, we argue that the major burden of environmental protection in agriculture cannot be placed on agricultural research institutions, since these institutions will have relatively little leverage over the key forces — the nature of agricultural structure and deleterious public agricultural policies — which lead to degradation of agroecosystems


Title : Agricultural structure, agricultural policy, and environmental quality: Some observations on the context of agricultural research in North America
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 7
Issue No. : 4
Author : Frederick H. Buttel, Michael E. Gertler
Printed Year : 1982
No of Pages  : 18
Description : 

 Abstract: This paper discusses how the context of agricultural research in North America is shaped by the structure of agricultural production, by agricultural policy, and by the nature of agricultural research institutions. Our principal concerns are: (1) the historical influences of agricultural research on the structure of agricultural production and on resource management in North American agriculture, and (2) the constraints on agricultural research institutions in developing technologies which will facilitate the husbanding of agroecosystems. We argue that the autonomous role of agricultural research in shaping the structure of agriculture and in causing degradation of agricultural resources is often overestimated; for example, the principal dynamics of change in North American agriculture were apparent well before the surge of productivity-oriented agricultural research after World War II. We also suggest that the nature of North American agricultural structure and historical and contemporary agricultural policies have decidedly influenced the context of agricultural research and have led to a number of major barriers to more beneficent management of agricultural resources. The distinctive characteristics of North American agricultural research institutions are emphasized, particularly those characteristics such as the decentralized nature of agricultural research in conjunction with the often invisible power of professional scientific organizations that limit the ability of research institutions to develop innovative approaches to agricultural resource management. Nonetheless, we argue that the major burden of environmental protection in agriculture cannot be placed on agricultural research institutions, since these institutions will have relatively little leverage over the key forces — the nature of agricultural structure and deleterious public agricultural policies — which lead to degradation of agroecosystems


Title : Agriculture and conservation - ecological and social aspects
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 4
Issue No. : 1
Author : Ulrich Hampicke
Printed Year : 1978
No of Pages  : 17
Description : 

 Abstract: The technological features and the economic and political repercussions are discussed of an agricultural system which would meet strict conservation requirements in central Europe, should they exist. First, the rate and number of species losses are discussed with special reference to vascular plants. A classification of endangered species according to the ecosystems to which they belong shows clearly that, among other activities, agriculture today contributes substantially to species reduction, mainly by levelling environments towards moderately moist and strongly eutrophic conditions, thereby destroying environmental variety, and by causing permanent stress from low-level toxicity. Traditional agriculture, on the contrary, largely enhanced species variety. Since a return to pre-industrial modes of agriculture seems impossible, it is suggested that the countryside be divided systematically into areas of high productivity, and others where traditional methods of land use are continued. According to present knowledge, high agricultural productivity does not itself seem to be ecologically deleterious if proper methods are used, nor should conserving the pre-industrial countryside pose any fundamental technical problems. Difficulties arise, however, in effectively separating the two areas from each other, as many factors responsible for species reduction are difficult to localize. Three possibilities for protecting ecologically valuable regions against these factors are discussed: abolishing the use of pesticides etc. altogether; improved methods of crop spraying to prevent spray falling onto adjacent areas; and adaptation to unavoidable spray scattering by spatial structuring, i.e., installing buffer areas between productive and protected zones. None of the three measures could be used exclusively, but, rather, a combination of them is required. With regard to the political and economic consequences of such a system, three indispensable prerequisites are identified: an adequate system of value judgments in society; sufficient economic flexibility to allow changes; and proper means of coordination, i.e., economic planning.

 
It is maintained that economic inflexibility is the main obstacle to an ecologically sound agriculture, whereas planning requirements, though incompatible with market principles in theory, could in practice be absorbed by the political system in the long run. The main obstacles seem to lie, not in genuine structural principles of capitalism, but rather in complicated historical circumstances. It is concluded, therefore, that gradual improvements on a local scale are possible and should be encouraged.

Title : Agriculture and the environment
Subject : Agriculture and the environment
Volume No. : 1
Issue No. : 1
Author : F. De Soet (Editor-in-Chief), Agriculture and the Environment
Printed Year : 1974
No of Pages  : 15
Description : 

 Abstract: The environment is influenced by agriculture and agriculture is dependent upon environment, a fact which can be seen in the relationship of agriculture to the landscape and in the way in which agriculture and animal husbandry are practised. Agriculture can be characterised in terms of its pattern or structure, and its dynamic processes (energy flow, nutrient cycling, succession, soil formation etc.)

 
If we are to ensure the survival of life on earth serious consideration must be given to both the quantitative and qualitative food requirements of rapidly growing population and the effective production of food without overtaxing the environment. This can only be achieved within the framework of conservation and management of the biosphere and requires a thorough examination of both the patterns and processes of agriculture. The problems of arable farming, animal husbandry and food supply, and their impact on the environment, vary considerably, as is evident from a comparison between industrialized and developing countries. Economic, historical, political, sociological and other causes also play a part. Furthermore, the possibilities for, and implementation of, an integration of agriculture and environmental management depend on numerous factors, and require the use of the research potential of a great number of scientific disciplines. A scientific journal designed to facilitate the exchange of ideas on the subject is therefore much needed.
 
Agriculture and Environment aims to fill the need by providing a platform for discussion and a medium for the communication, information and guidance of experts from all over the world — whether they work in government, scientific research institutes, universities, private enterprise, international organizations, or any other sector of the community concerned with the problem.
 
This new quarterly journal, concerned with the balance between food production and environmental and biospherical management, will contain papers of world-wide interest on all aspects of the interdependence of agriculture and animal husbandry and their environment.

Title : An economic evaluation of cropland use as a control for sediment nonpoint pollution
Subject : Agriculture and Environment
Volume No. : 3
Issue No. : 4
Author : James C. Wade, Earl O. Heady
Printed Year : 1977
No of Pages  : 16
Description : 

 Abstract: Substantial economic change occurs if national goals of sediment control are established. An environmental/economic model of national agricultural production and sediment—water quality analyses five alternative goals of sediment control to give insight into changes in farm production technologies, incomes, pollution levels, and consumer and producer costs in the 48 contiguous United States.

 Journal Paper No. J-8578 of the Iowa Agricultural and Home Economics Experiment Station, Ames, Iowa. Project 2106. This study was funded in part by the National Science Foundation RANN program under grant GI-32990.

 ∗∗Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; and Curtiss Distinguished Professor of Agriculture, Professor of Economics, and Director, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa.


Title : An efficient recovery of gold and other noble metals from electronic and other scraps
Subject : Conservation & Recycling
Volume No. : 10
Issue No. : 4
Author : Hidetoshi Baba
Printed Year : 1987
No of Pages  : 5
Description : 

Abstract: Pure gold is extracted from crude gold by the solvent extraction method in the recovery and refining process for Noble metals recovered from electronic and other scraps. This solvent extraction method is advantageous in that it facilitates rapid processing, thereby reducing the interest burden of gold staying too long in the unit. Therefore, the method is also used in the refining of platinum and palladium. Technological innovation has created more complex and diversified types of scraps, and efforts are being made to accommodate ourselves to such a trend.


Title : An environmental characterization study of a proof-of-concept municipal solid waste digestion plant: Pompano Beach, Florida
Subject : Conservation & Recycling
Volume No. : 10
Issue No. : 4
Author : Subrata Sengupta, Kau-Fui V. Wong, Nelson Nemerow, Murray Strietfeld, Ramarathnam Narasimhan, Arno Tilles
Printed Year : 1987
No of Pages  : 17
Description : 

Abstract: An environmental investigation on a 100 ton/day anaerobic digestion plant has been conducted. All input and output streams were analyzed for physical, chemical and microbiological impact. Some mutagenic studies were also conducted. Numerous samples were analyzed over a period of three years for variables of regulatory concern. A few samples were intensively analyzed for trace and ultratrace compounds in the USEPA priority pollutant list. Some batch leaching tests were conducted to estimate the impact of liquid effluents on local soils.


Title : Analysis and deliberation as a mechanism to assess changes in preferences for indicators of sustainable forest management: A case study in Puebla, Mexico
Subject : Journal of Environmental Management
Volume No. : 128
Issue No. : na
Author : Sandra Rodriguez-Piñeros, David K. Lewis
Printed Year : 2013
No of Pages  : 9
Description : 

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess changes in forest owners' preferences regarding indicators of sustainable forest management. The analysis and deliberation framework served as a platform upon which to explore these changes in a rural community in Puebla, Mexico. Sixty-two indicators were selected from existing sets to design a five-point Likert survey instrument. The instrument was administered three times: early in the study to capture the forest owners' preferences before intervention (baseline); following an educational meeting in which the participants learned of three alternative forest management plans (analysis); and following a community meeting in which the forest owners deliberated to choose one of the alternatives (deliberation).

As forest owners were exposed to knowledge (analysis) and deliberation, their preferences for the indicators changed significantly. An examination of the instrument demonstrated how the indicators increased or decreased in importance. Social and economic indicators tended to be ranked differently following analysis and again following deliberation because of the commitment to pursue a forest management plan that would benefit the community without jeopardizing stakeholder values. The ecological indicators directly associated with forest structure gained relevance following the analysis meeting. The deliberation process elucidated the importance of forest administration and professional help.

Forest owners' preferences were reflected by the selection of the management plan that included good science and accommodated community values. The forest owners changed their preferences in response to new knowledge, management objectives, and their commitment to safeguarding the future condition of the forest. Analysis and deliberation is a participatory forum that facilities communication and learning and allows stakeholders to share values; thus, it serves as a mechanism for forest planning.